Tag Archives: version

DEADPOOL’S ART OF WAR #1 Rewrites the Book on Combat This October!

Deadpool_Art_of_War_1_Cover

It’s been called the definitive work on military strategy and tactics. Sun Tzu’s seminal Art of War has influenced warfare for hundreds of years. From battlefields to Boardrooms and beyond, there has never been a work more important when it comes to strategy and preparation. Until now! Today, Marvel is proud to present your first look at DEADPOOL’S ART OF WAR #1 – the first chapter in a new 4-issue limited series adapting its classic and iconic namesake! from New York Times Bestselling writer Peter David (All-New X-Factor, The Incredible Hulk) and fan-favorite artist Scott Koblish (Deadpool)!

The Merc With a Mouth knows a thing or two about combat and tactics, and he’s gearing up to write his own version of Art of War. It’s in the public domain so it’s totally ripe for being ripped off. Times change, and today we have heat seeking missiles and automatic machine guns so how accurate can the original book really be?

Only it’ll take more than a great book if Deadpool wants to outsell the original. His plan? Cause enough war and chaos around the globe so that they’ll have to buy his book! Though he’ll get more than he bargained for when the Asgardians, Avengers, X-Men and more get involved. Be there when military strategy takes a gigantic leap forward in DEADPOOL’S ART OF WAR #1 this October!

San Diego Comic-Con Sues Salt Lake Comic Con


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San Diego Comic Convention, which operates San Diego Comic-Con, has filed suit in federal court against the organizers of Salt Lake Comic Con, and is asserting, for the first time that we’re aware, that the way Salt Lake is using “Comic Con” is an infringement on “Comic-Con” or on “Comic Con International,” at least in this case.  San Diego argues that the graphic design of SLCC’s use of “Comic Con,” which de-emphasizes the “Salt Lake” and emphasizes “Comic Con” is confusingly similar to San Diego’s marks.


San Diego seemed especially incensed by the Salt Lake group’s activities around San Diego Comic-Con this year, when it had an Audi skinned with “Salt Lake Comic Con” (again, with the type on “Comic Con” significantly larger than the type on “Salt Lake”) delivered to a hotel near the show.  The hotel called the San Diego convention organizers, according to the complaint, believing that it was meant for them.  The Salt Lake group used the car around the San Diego Convention Center to promote its show, according to the complaint.

San Diego also points to the Salt Lake merch, which has the large “Comic Con” and smaller “Salt Lake” design for the logo as well.

The complaint also notes that the Salt Lake organizers publicized their intentions in an interview with Expoweb (now part of Folio), in which Bryan Brandenburg was quoted as saying, “We knew that the term ‘comic con’ is kind of like a Xerox, it’s a generic brand.  All it means is comic convention, but we knew that there was brand equity associated with the phrase that we could capitalize on, being the only comic con in our market.”

The Expoweb article also says, “The core audience would be served by leveraging the name and experience associated with other giant comic cons, including the industry’s mega show, Comic Con International, but Brandenburg wanted to cast a wider net.”

San Diego requests a judgment, damages, triple damages for willful conduct, fees, costs, interest, and an injunction against the use of its mark or actions “likely to cause” confusion about San Diego’s association with the Salt Lake show.

For its part, the Salt Lake group has an effective PR campaign centered on its website, in which it lays out its position:
 

“Our position is that the phrases ‘comic con,’ ‘comicon’ and even ‘comic-con’ are generic and are abbreviations for the term ‘comic convention.’  This has been a common expression since 1964, 6 years before San Diego Comic-Con even existed.  When used with another set of words such as ‘Salt Lake,’ ‘Big Apple,’ ‘Chicago’ or ‘New York’ they become a name that has protection and exclusivity.

“There are over a hundred ‘comic con’ companies that freely use a variation of comic con in their name and have done so long before San Diego Comic-Con International was granted a trademark for ‘Comic-Con’ in 2005.  The validity of this trademark has been questioned by lawyers and was never intended to be a far reaching exclusive trademark for any related comic con name.”


Lawyers may have “questioned” the validity of San Diego’s trademarks, as the Salt Lake group asserts, but it has them, and the time for objection has passed.  The trademarks include “Comic-Con,” “Comic Con International,” and the graphic design for its logo.  San Diego has also filed for a mark for “Anaheim Comic-Con” recently; that mark is not incontestable like the others.  The Anaheim mark is presumably for the show it has been running as Wonder Con, which was originally a San Francisco-area show.

This is the first time we’ve seen San Diego Comic Convention sue over its marks, although based on public actions, it appears that it has previously exerted pressure.  Shows that were using the hyphenated version of Comic-Con (including Wizard World, which just reported rapidly increasing earnings, see
have suddenly stopped and rebranded with the unhyphenated version at various points in the past.  But this is something different.  The argument seems to be that the Salt Lake show is trying to pass itself off as associated with San Diego Comic-Con through its use of “Comic Con” with small or absent identification as being from Salt Lake City, and through other means.

The Salt Lake City shows have been wildly successful in drawing attendance, if less so in driving sales for its exhibitors.

So the issue is huge, not just for San Diego Comic-Con and Salt Lake Comic Con, but for the exploding fan convention business, which has now reached $600 million in annual ticket sales.

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DEADPOOL’s ART OF WAR #1 Rewrites the Book on Warfare This October!

Deadpool's_Art_of_War_1_Cover

It’s been called the definitive work on military strategy and tactics. Sun Tzu’s seminal Art of War has influenced warfare for hundreds of years. From the battlefield to business and beyond, there has never been a work of more import when it comes to strategy and preparation. Until now! Today, Marvel is proud to announce DEADPOOL’S ART OF WAR #1 – the first chapter in a new 4-issue mini-series from New York Times Bestselling writer Peter David (All-New X-Factor, The Incredible Hulk) and fan-favorite artist Scott Koblish (Deadpool)!

The Merc With a Mouth knows a thing or two about combat, and he’s gearing up to write his own version of Art of War. I mean, Sun Tzu didn’t even have laser guided missiles or an Incredible Hulk back then, so how accurate can his book on war really be? But it’ll take more than a great book if Deadpool wants to outsell the original. His plan? Cause enough chaos and war across the world that they’ll have to buy his book when it comes out! How’s that for strategy?

“[Deadpool’s] guided by the words of Sun Tzu and tries to apply the book’s thinking to the war he winds up starting as a result,” says writer Peter David, in an interview with Marvel.com. “His results are, shall we say, mixed.”

Asgardians, Avengers, X-Men – you name it, Deadpool’s probably going to have some trouble with them when he tries to star the next world war. Prepare for the next step in military strategy when the chaotic mayhem begins in DEADPOOL’S ART OF WAR #1 this October!

Mark Ruffalo Promises ‘Very Cool Science Bros Stuff’ In AVENGERS: AGE OF ULTRON

“There’s lots of ‘Science Bros. stuff” said Mark Ruffalo of Bruce Banner and Tony Stark’s (Robert Downey Jr.) fan-favorite dynamic in Age of Ultron that was established in The Avengers. “There’s some cool Science Bros stuff… very cool stuff,” he added. Ruffalo then reassured that he’s seen the many Tumblr memes and art inspired by the dynamic. When asked for an update on another potential Hulk movie, Mark Ruffalo said, “I think they are, for the first time, entertaining the idea of it.” He continued, “When we did The Avengers it was basically ‘No!’, and now there is some consideration for it. But there’s still nothing definitive, not even a skeletal version of what it would be. I look forward to going down that road, if we could crack that nut.”

Marvel Studios producer Kevin Feige has said himself that if there are any plans for Hulk to go solo again, it would be after Avengers: Age of Ultron. Plus, the original Incredible Hulk, Lou Ferrigno, has said twice now that there will definitely be another movie, even though he’s not really in the know. Therefore, Mark Ruffalo’s comment that Marvel is now considering the idea doesn’t exactly indicate any progression. However, given the actor knows where The Avengers sequel will leave the Jade Giant, perhaps that’s where the concept for a new standalone Hulk movie will come about.

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What Happened to Rich Rider? Find Out in GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #18 – an ORIGINAL SIN tie-in!

Guardians_of_the_Galaxy_18_Cover

This August, the burning question of what happened to one of the greatest heroes of in the Marvel Universe finally gets answered in GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #18 – an Original Sin tie-in! New York Times Bestselling creators Brian Michael Bendis and Ed McGuinness bring you the blockbuster answer to the question on everyone’s mind:

What happened to Richard Rider?

“We have literally been dropping hints since the Guardians guest-starred in Avengers Assemble,” says Brian Michael Bendis in an interview with Marvel.com. “I have known exactly what we were doing with this from the moment I agreed to do the book, but I thought it would be best to slow burn the reveal.”

Nova, the Human Rocket – once one of the greatest heroes in the Marvel Universe, gone in a flash. Side-by-side with Star-Lord, Nova fought valiantly to save the entire universe from encroaching death. Sealed in a twisted and horrific version of our own universe, Richard Rider sacrificed everything to prevent the onslaught of Thanos. 

The true story of that sacrifice has never been told. Though Star-Lord and Thanos miraculously returned, Nova was nowhere to be found. The truth behind his absence kept a closely guarded secret between two bitter enemies. A secret that will finally be revealed!

“Not only does this reveal answer a question for diehard readers, it also tells something about the character to newer readers,” continued Bendis.

“This is a story Brian Bendis has been dying to tell for several years,” says Executive Editor Mike Marts. ”Now that time is finally here and we can’t wait for readers to find out what happened to Richard Rider!”

How did Star-Lord and Thanos escape their hellish imprisonment? And why did Nova not return with them? The explosive last stand of Richard Rider begins now! No fan can afford to miss the blockbuster GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #18!